Perversely Creative
Perverse: willfully determine to counter what is expected or desired
posted 4 hours ago + 183,538 notes — via cranberrydelight, © zaynx
weescottishkid:

catully:

pinkrobotgirl:

fleecedragons:

myheartofgoldturnedplatinum:

alwaysyourbaby:

desert-revolution:


I firmly believe that the reason many Slytherins were easily convinced to join Voldemort was because they were treated like shit by the rest of the houses while they were growing up. Imagine spending seven of the most important years of your life being told that you were part of the bad house and therefore bad yourself. Everyone boos your quidditch team. All the houses will hang out with everyone except you. You grow up being hated by your fellow students and many of your teachers.
Now imagine someone comes along and tells you that you’re not worthless and bad. That you’re invited to join a family where you will right the wrongs committed against you. You have the opportunity to be wanted and powerful instead of a hated outcast. Several of your former classmates are telling you how great it is. How you’re welcomed and needed. These are the kids you grew up with. The classmates who went through all the same things you did. Being a Death Eater sounds pretty good now.

I’ve been waiting for a post like this.

THIS.

BLESS THIS POST

!!!!
thank

I was always bothered by the scene at the end of book 7, when the students are asked whether they want to fight the incoming Death Eater army. The Slytherin students are all like, “Uh. No?” And they’re treated like terrorists for it. In the movie, they’re even locked in the school dungeons while everyone cheers.
Did nobody stop to think and realize that if the Sytherin students had stood and fought, they would have been facing their own parents on a battlefield? Even if some of them weren’t really on board with the whole Death Eater thing, expecting them to fight was just cruel. They were children. The oldest of them were seventeen. Babies. And their own professors were asking them to shoot illegal killing spells at Mum and Dad.
Imagine you are a Slytherin and you are staying behind to defend your school and maybe restore some honor to your House. The other students are all giving you mistrustful glares. You know they’re waiting for you to start hitting them in the back with stunning spells. You consider doing it, too, because you’re already starting to regret the choice you made.
Then the battle begins, and you are up against a crowd of strangers who aren’t strangers at all. You recognize voices, muffled behind masks but still piercingly familiar. Your uncle. Your cousin. Your best friend’s big sister.
And then you see a tall man in expensive grey robes. A moment later you notice the small, curvy woman next to him, wand ready. They are guarding each others backs.
You recognize their shoes.

I always though this. And at the end of The Philosopher’s Stone? Slytherin had worked incredibly hard, and Dumbledore made sure that just enough points were given to students who had done about a million things against the school rules so that they would lose. I think that Slytherin house was victimised a lot, and I kind of  hope now that the likes of Scorpius Malfoy won’t have to go through such prejudice. Perhaps, after the war, people realised that all Slytherins weren’t to blame  Probably not, though.

This is super interesting because that kind of constant put downs and stuff and only being accepted by the wrong people is how people end up in white supremacist gangs

weescottishkid:

catully:

pinkrobotgirl:

fleecedragons:

myheartofgoldturnedplatinum:

alwaysyourbaby:

desert-revolution:

I firmly believe that the reason many Slytherins were easily convinced to join Voldemort was because they were treated like shit by the rest of the houses while they were growing up. Imagine spending seven of the most important years of your life being told that you were part of the bad house and therefore bad yourself. Everyone boos your quidditch team. All the houses will hang out with everyone except you. You grow up being hated by your fellow students and many of your teachers.

Now imagine someone comes along and tells you that you’re not worthless and bad. That you’re invited to join a family where you will right the wrongs committed against you. You have the opportunity to be wanted and powerful instead of a hated outcast. Several of your former classmates are telling you how great it is. How you’re welcomed and needed. These are the kids you grew up with. The classmates who went through all the same things you did. Being a Death Eater sounds pretty good now.

I’ve been waiting for a post like this.

THIS.

BLESS THIS POST

!!!!

thank

I was always bothered by the scene at the end of book 7, when the students are asked whether they want to fight the incoming Death Eater army. The Slytherin students are all like, “Uh. No?” And they’re treated like terrorists for it. In the movie, they’re even locked in the school dungeons while everyone cheers.

Did nobody stop to think and realize that if the Sytherin students had stood and fought, they would have been facing their own parents on a battlefield? Even if some of them weren’t really on board with the whole Death Eater thing, expecting them to fight was just cruel. They were children. The oldest of them were seventeen. Babies. And their own professors were asking them to shoot illegal killing spells at Mum and Dad.

Imagine you are a Slytherin and you are staying behind to defend your school and maybe restore some honor to your House. The other students are all giving you mistrustful glares. You know they’re waiting for you to start hitting them in the back with stunning spells. You consider doing it, too, because you’re already starting to regret the choice you made.

Then the battle begins, and you are up against a crowd of strangers who aren’t strangers at all. You recognize voices, muffled behind masks but still piercingly familiar. Your uncle. Your cousin. Your best friend’s big sister.

And then you see a tall man in expensive grey robes. A moment later you notice the small, curvy woman next to him, wand ready. They are guarding each others backs.

You recognize their shoes.

I always though this. And at the end of The Philosopher’s Stone? Slytherin had worked incredibly hard, and Dumbledore made sure that just enough points were given to students who had done about a million things against the school rules so that they would lose. I think that Slytherin house was victimised a lot, and I kind of  hope now that the likes of Scorpius Malfoy won’t have to go through such prejudice. Perhaps, after the war, people realised that all Slytherins weren’t to blame  Probably not, though.

This is super interesting because that kind of constant put downs and stuff and only being accepted by the wrong people is how people end up in white supremacist gangs

#proud 2 b slytherin


posted 4 hours ago + 13,615 notes — via slytherinquidditchcaptain, © sodisarmingdarling
"I asked my ex, now good friend, if she would ever have an open relationship and she said, “No, I don’t think I could do that” then after a pause and a smile, “but what about love affair friendships?” She went on to describe an impenetrable fortress of female friendship, her own group of best mates who’d known each other since school and had supported and loved each other through almost all of their lifetimes. They sounded far more bonded to, and in love with one another, than their respective husbands. It struck me that we don’t have the language to reflect the diversity and breadth of connections we experience. Why is sex the thing we tend to define a relationship by, when in fact it can be simple casual fun without a deep emotional transaction? Why do we say “just friends” when, for some of us, a friendship goes deeper? Can we define a new currency of commitment that celebrates and values this? Instead of having multiple confusing interpretations of the same word, could we have different words? What if we viewed our relationships as a pyramid structure with our primary partner at the top and a host of lovers, friends, spiritual soul mates, colleagues, and acquaintances beneath that?"
#quotes #specialis


posted 4 hours ago + 355,560 notes — via thecinderelladiaries, © movedtojackhowarcl

shitphan:

when u start lusting over someone but then realise you actually have a really big crush on them 

image



posted 4 hours ago + 102 notes — via slytherinquidditchcaptain, © natureworldnews.com
mindblowingscience:

Media Multitasking, Not as Distracting as You Think

In this digitally-ruled world, it seems that everyone is always plugged into their iPhones, iPads, televisions and laptops, sometimes all at once. But this type of media multitasking is not as distracting as you think.
Telling adolescents juggling several electronic devices to “focus on the task at hand” may in fact hinder their performance, according to new research.
"Maybe practice really does make perfect," researcher Alexandra Ulmer, a senior at Oregon Episcopal School, said in a press release.
"In our current multimedia environment, there are people who are multitasking at an exceedingly high rate, and the reality is that they may have become really good at it," added co-author Sarayu Caulfield.
To study how media multitasking affects adolescents’ ability to process information, the researchers recruited 196 females and 207 males ages 10-19. After answering questions on their daily media habits, participants then completed randomly assigned tests to assess their ability to switch between tasks and to focus on a single task. Either they completed the assignment without distractions, or with auditory, visual and cognitive distractions such as responding to emails.
Surprisingly, the popular notion that multitasking results in poor performance was debunked for adolescents, who spend a lot of time switching between media devices and tasks.
According to the study, non-multitaskers averaged about 2.5 hours of homework per day and were multitasking 0.08 percent of this time. Meanwhile, those adept at multitasking did homework for about 3.5 hours a day and juggled multiple tasks for more than 50 percent of this time.
High media multitaskers were better at filtering out distractions, but in fact performed worse when made to focus on a single task, possibly suggesting that teaching styles should be modified accordingly.
"This study suggests that digital natives (adolescents who grew up with exposure to multiple media) with high multiple media use may have developed an enhanced working memory and perform better in distracting environments than when focused on a single task with no distractions," Ulmer added.
The findings were presented Oct. 11 at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference & Exhibition.

mindblowingscience:

Media Multitasking, Not as Distracting as You Think

In this digitally-ruled world, it seems that everyone is always plugged into their iPhones, iPads, televisions and laptops, sometimes all at once. But this type of media multitasking is not as distracting as you think.

Telling adolescents juggling several electronic devices to “focus on the task at hand” may in fact hinder their performance, according to new research.

"Maybe practice really does make perfect," researcher Alexandra Ulmer, a senior at Oregon Episcopal School, said in a press release.

"In our current multimedia environment, there are people who are multitasking at an exceedingly high rate, and the reality is that they may have become really good at it," added co-author Sarayu Caulfield.

To study how media multitasking affects adolescents’ ability to process information, the researchers recruited 196 females and 207 males ages 10-19. After answering questions on their daily media habits, participants then completed randomly assigned tests to assess their ability to switch between tasks and to focus on a single task. Either they completed the assignment without distractions, or with auditory, visual and cognitive distractions such as responding to emails.

Surprisingly, the popular notion that multitasking results in poor performance was debunked for adolescents, who spend a lot of time switching between media devices and tasks.

According to the study, non-multitaskers averaged about 2.5 hours of homework per day and were multitasking 0.08 percent of this time. Meanwhile, those adept at multitasking did homework for about 3.5 hours a day and juggled multiple tasks for more than 50 percent of this time.

High media multitaskers were better at filtering out distractions, but in fact performed worse when made to focus on a single task, possibly suggesting that teaching styles should be modified accordingly.

"This study suggests that digital natives (adolescents who grew up with exposure to multiple media) with high multiple media use may have developed an enhanced working memory and perform better in distracting environments than when focused on a single task with no distractions," Ulmer added.

The findings were presented Oct. 11 at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference & Exhibition.



posted 4 hours ago + 34 notes — via slytherinquidditchcaptain, © lixrps

lixrps:

when ur visibly more excited than ur partner for a plot

image



posted 4 hours ago + 20,934 notes — via cranberrydelight, © owlhaus

owlhaus:

Hogwarts Quidditch designs. These were fun! Don’t know what to do with them first.

#hp


posted 4 hours ago

I might go to the anime club meeting if they show K Project. That anime is gorgeous

#school woes #k


posted 4 hours ago + 10,622 notes — via animoo-o, © yangxiaolong-the-meddler

yangxiaolong-the-meddler:

ah you’re watching Attack on Titan? I love that show! The way they all just [clenches fist] never resolve any plot points whatsoever

#snk


posted 5 hours ago + 539,300 notes — via fulltimespoopy, © paatroklos

paatroklos:

Every time I think of the black market, I actually imagine a market, with little stalls selling illegal things like nuclear weapons and organs.



posted 5 hours ago + 1,871 notes — via dollyriot, © holden-caulfieldlings


posted 5 hours ago

We are probably going to fail this

#school woes


posted 5 hours ago + 3,566 notes — via kirrua, © rainnieday

Kuroshitsuji - the book of murder

#kuroshitsuji


posted 5 hours ago + 98,180 notes — via trigunned, © bootyhole-princess

realdwntomars:

Being able to find someone you click with so naturally is the best feeling ever. You feel like you’ve been best friends you’re whole life, it feels like you’re coming home. You’re so comfortable with them. Maybe that’s what a soulmate is. Not someone who shares every single thing in common with you, but someone who feels like home.



posted 6 hours ago + 20,016 notes — via rhythmxecho, © skrillexbeifong

Each main Legend of Korra villain represents a different political ideology.

Even the more minor villains like Varrick (who is not always necessarily a villain) and the Earth Queen represent ideologies as well:  Capitalism and Monarchy, respectively.

#the atlas of korra


posted 7 hours ago + 6,445 notes — via quewrty, © foreverweddings
chamelion-circuit:

foreverweddings:

 Because big, bulky boxes are not obvious at all. 

This is super smart

chamelion-circuit:

foreverweddings:

 Because big, bulky boxes are not obvious at all. 

This is super smart